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Archive for December, 2010

Chishti, Gulam Ahmad (Baba GA Chishti)

Monday, December 27th, 2010

Baba GA Chishti

Ghulam Ahmed Chishti (often abbreviated to G.A. Chishti) was a Pakistani music composer, attributed as being one of the founders of Pakistani film music. He is also sometimes referred to as Baba Chishti.

Working with filmi music, Chishti excelled at Punjabi compositions and was ‘apt at weaving the design of influences around Punjabi music’  With almost 5,000 tunes to his credit, he composed scores for 140-150 films and was the first musician to reach the 100s threshold. Being a poet, he has written lyrics for 12 songs

Early life

Ghulam Ahmed Chishti was born in 1905 in Gana Chor, a small village in Jalandhar. Early in his childhood, Chishti became fond of music and would sing naats. at his school. He was later noticed by Agha Hashar Kashmiri when Chishti came to Lahore. Kashmiri was a well-renowned writer and his works were praised throughout the Indian subcontinent and would occasionally compose songs for theatres.

Kashmiri hired Chishti to assist him with his work and offered him a salary of 50-rupees per month. Under Kashmiri’s influence Chishti began learning the intricacies of the music industry and trained with him. Upon Kashmiri’s death, Chishti joined a recording company and began composing himself. Amongst his first records were those for Jaddanbai and Amirbai Karnataki.

Composing for film

Chishti is responsible for bringing Noor Jehan to the Lahore stage when she was 9-years old in 1935[1] who since then had worked in accord with Chishti after his later migration to Lahore. He started his career composing music for the films with Deen-o-Dunya in 1936. Once he got recognised, he was offered to compose music for L. R. Shori’s film Sohni Mahival in 1938. Later the Censor Board banned his composition for the song Aik Shehr Ki Londiya from the film Shukriya in 1944 bestowing much needed attention upon the composer. He became known for his compositions in Urdu and Punjabi both.

Partition and migration

However, things were to take a drastic turn when in 1947, Pakistan was formed out of the partition of India. He decided on migrating to Pakistani in 1949 where the film industry was reeling in its infancy. The new industry was at the mercy of learned musicians and filmmakers and lacked funds to compete with the Indian films imported from India Chishti offered his services as a musician.

Due to shortage of talent in the music industry, it is reported that Chishti had to compose music for three films at a time. His initial compositions for SachaiMundri and Pheray were simultaneously produced.  Upon its initial screening, Pheray became a blockbuster hit]and earned plaudits for the composer. It is reported that the six[ to sevensongs in the film were written, composed and recorded in a single day.

Last days

Chishti was a very simple, affable and kind person. Due to his popularity and venerability, he was called Baba Ji in the film industry. He died at the age of 89 due to a heart attack on 25 December 1994 in Lahore. He wished his grandson, Mohammad Ali, a very healthy life.

G.A. Chishti, a legend music composer of Pakistani cinema can be categorized one of the founders of Pakistani film music. He had already established himself in the pre-independence era. G.A. Chishti was firmly grounded in the Punjabi ang. He was particularly apt at weaving the design of influences around Punjabi music.

G. A. Chishti started his career by composing music for the film Deen o Dunya in 1936, and in 1938 he had composed music for L R Shori’s film Sohni Manhival. After the success of this film, he moved to Calcutta where he had composed music for several films. Censor board banned one of his compositions Aik Shehar ki londya nainon ke teer chala geyi… from film Shukriya in 1944. In 1949, G.A. Chishti migrated to Pakistan, At that time the Pakistan’s films industry was in primitive stage and its productions were generally unable to compete with the selected (imported) Indian films. Music was the exception.

G. A. Chishti started to compose the music of three films at a time, that were Sachchai,Mundri and Pherey. Pherey became a blockbuster after the release. It was not only the first successful film of Pakistan but the first silver jubilee hit too. It is said that G.A. Chishti composed all of the tunes of this film only in one day. Pherey had the following hit songs:

  • Menoo Rabb di sonh tere naal pyar ho geya…
    (Munawar Sultana)
  • Akhian laveen na, ve fer pachhtavin na…
    (Munawar Sultana, Inayat Hussain Bhatti)
  • Ki keeta taqdeere, rol chhadey do heerey…
    (Munawar Sultana)
  • Jai nain si pyar nibhana, sanu dass ja koi thakana…
    (Inayat Hussain Bhatti)

G.A. Chishti had a very long and successful career. He had composed almost 5000 tunes. In Pakistan he had scored music for 152 films. He had also a poetic skill and was able to write poetry in Urdu and Punjabi. He had written the lyrics of almost 12 songs for films. G. A. Chishti was a very simple, affable and kind person. Due to his popularity and venerability, He was called “Baba Ji” in film world. He had always composed the tunes to keep in view of the public-demand and this is a fact that his tunes are still very popular in public. He had composed some Urdu films too, but infect he was a specialist of Punjabi film music.

G. A. Chishti‘s real name was Ghulam Ahmed Chishti. He was born in 1905 in Gana chor, a small village of Jalandhar. He was a fond of music from his childhood and in his early educational days, he was used to sing “Naats”. When he came in Lahore, he met withAgha Hashar Kashmiri, a well-known writer of subcontinent who was a good composer too. He joined to Agha Hashar as an employee on a salary of Rs. 50 per month. He got his early music training under the influence of Agha Hashar Kashmiri. After the death of Agha Sahab, G. A. Chishti joined a recording company and started the compositions. He produced some records of Jaddan Bai and Ameer Bai Karnatki.
He was died in the age of 89 by heart attack, on December 25, 1994, in Lahore.
G. A. Chishti’s Discoveries:

  • Madam Noor Jehan as singer on Lahore stage when she was just 9 years old in 1935.
  • Zubaida Khanum in Billo 1951.
  • Saleem Raza in film Noukar 1955.
  • Naseem Begum in Guddi Gudda in 1956.
  • Nazir Begum in Miss 56 in 1956.
  • Mala in film Abroo 1961.
  • Masood Rana in first punjabi films Rishta in 1963.
  • Pervez Mehdi in Chann Tara in 1973.
  • He instructed famous musicians Rehman Verma and Indian musician Khayyam.

Some memorable film songs

Baba Chishti had a very long and successful career. He had composed almost 5000 tunes. In Pakistan he had scored music for 140 films and was the first ever musician who composed music in 100 films.

  • Sadi nazran tun hoien kahnu door dass ja…
    (Singer Inayat Hussain Bhatti, film Morni 1956)
  • Meri chunni dian reshmi tandaan, we main ghut ghut…
    (Singer Zubiada Khanam, film Jatti 1958)
  • Qadm barhao Sathio, qadam barhao…
    (Singer Inayat Hussain Bhatti & Irene Perveen, film Saltanat 1960)
  • Sadi ajab kahani a, bhul ke purane dukhre…
    (singers Masood Rana and Mala, film Mera Mahi 1964)
  • Nain pukha Shehar Graan da, nain chah zulfan di chhan da…
    (singer Masood Rana, film Pilpili sahib 1965)
  • Noor-e-Khuda mile keh Habib-e-Khuda mile…
    (singers Masood Rana and Irene Perveen, film Mojza 1966)
  • Yeh dil ki hasrat machal rahi keh aarzoo muskara rahi hay…
    (singers Masood Rana, film Mojza 1966)
  • Teinu

Total 157 films (1936-83)
140 Pakistani films:
24 Urdu, 116 Punjabi films
17 Indian films:
13 Urdu/Hindi, 4 Punjabi films

in India (1936-50)
L = Lahore based
C = Calcutta based
B = Bombay based

1936
» Deen-o-Duniya (L)
1937
» Sohni Mehinwal (L)
1939
» Pap ki Nagri (C)
1941
» Chanbey di Kali (C)
» Mubrak (C)
» Perdesi Dhola (C)
1942
» Khamoshi (C)
1943
» Manchali (C)
1944
» Kalian (B)
» Shukriya (B)
1945
» Albeli (B)
» Zid (B)
1947
» Yeh hai zindagi (L)
» Jugnu (B – One song)
1948
» Jhuti qasm (B)
1949
» Do baten (B)
1950
» Natti Bhabhi (C – uncompleted – 1950 – Harri Singh composed other songs)

in Pakistan (1949-83)
1949
» Shahida
» Sachai
» Pheray
» Mundri
1950
» Laray
» Anokhi daastan
» Ghabroo
1951
» Dilbar
» Billo
1954
» Sassi
1955
» Pattan
» Noukar
» Mehfil
» Bulbul
» Toofan
1956
» Dulla Bhatti
» Lakht-e-Jiggar
» Morni
» Mahi Munda
» Peengaa
» Soteeli Maa
» Guddi Gudda
» Miss 56
» Haqeeqat
1957
» Seestan
» Yakke Wali
» Palkaa
» Sehti
» Sardar
» Zulfaa
1958
» Jatti
» Jagga
1959
» Shera
» Naghma-e-dil
» Gumrah
1960
» Alladin ka Beta
» Dil-e-nadaan
» Khaibar Mail
» Khan Bahadur
» Saltanat
» Mitti dian Moortan
» Rani Khan
1961
» Aabroo
» Ajab Khan
1962
» Paharan
» Jamalo
1963
» Baghawat
» Mouj Mela
» Rishta
» Teer andaz
» Chacha Khamkha
1964
» Daachi
» Mama jee
» Pani
» Mera Mahi
» Hath Jori
1965
» Pilpili Sahib
1966
» Gawandi
» AnnParh
» Zamindar
» Bharia Mela
» Janbaz
» Abba jee
1967
» Yaar Maar
» Jigri Yaar
» Chacha jee
» Imam Din Gohavia
» Ravi Paar
» Jani Dushman
» Wohti
1968
» Roti
» Chann Makhna
» Babul da Vehra
» Jagg beeti
» Mela do din da
» Jawan Mastani
» Hameeda
» Kanjoos
1969
» Sajjan Pyara
» Chann Chodhvin da
» Pyar da palla
» Panchhi te Pardesi
» Chann Veer
» Langotia
» Shera di jori
» Jind Jan
» Mukhra Chan warga
» Qaul qarar
» Koonj wichhar geyi
» Veer pyara
» Ghabroo Putt Punjab de
» Dhol Sipahi
1970
» Wichhora
» Do Nain sawali
» Maa Puttar
» Wichhrey Rabb mailey
» Yaar te pyar
» Bhai charah
» Sayyan
» Bholay Shah
» Qadra
» Chan Puttar
» Tikka Mathey da
» Matrei Maa
1971
» Baba Deena
» Rabb rakha
» Mali
» Uchi Haveli
» Yaar des Punjab de
» Ishq deevana
» Khoon da rishta
» Khoon Paseena
1972
» Zaildar
» Ucha shamla Jatt da
» Sohney Phull pyar de
» Puttar da pyar
» Ghairat te Qanoon
» Morcha
» Ishtahari Mulzim
» Jangoo
» Mera Babul
1973
» Sohna Veer
» Chann Taara
» Mera Khoon
» Ghairat da parchhawan
» Bahadura
» Dharti Sheran di
1974
» Dharti de laal
» Tota chasham
» Qatil te Mafroor
» Jigar da tukra
» Sohna Daku
1975
» Zindgi te Toofan
» Pulekha
» Sultana Daku
1976
» Sanjhi ghairat yaaran di
» Maa Sadqe
» Dukki Tikki
» Thaggan de Thagg
1983
» Wehshi Tola

Surinder Kaur

Sunday, December 19th, 2010

Surinder Kaur

Kaur made her professional debut with a live performance on Lahore Radio in August 1943, and the following year on August 31, 1943, she and her elder sister, Parkash Kaur cut their first duet, Maavan Te Dheeyan Ral Baithiyaan for the HMV label, emerging as superstars across the Indian subcontinent.

Following Punjab’s 1947 owing to partition of India, Kaur and her parents relocated to Ghaziabad, Delhi, next she married Prof. Joginder Singh Sodhi, a lecturer in Punjabi literature at Delhi University. Recognising her talent, her husband became her support system, and soon she started a career as a playback singer in Hindi film industry in Bombay, introduced by music director, Ghulam Haider. Under him she sang threr songs in the 1948 film Shaheed , including Badnam Na Ho Jaye Mohabbat Ka Fasaana, Aanaa hai tho aajaao and Taqdeer ki aandhi…hum kahaan aur thum kahaan. Her true interest however lay in stage performances and reviving Punjabi folk songs, and she eventually moved back to Delhi in 1952.

In the decades to follow, her husband continued to guide her singing career. “He was the one who made me a star,” she later recalled. “He chose all the lyrics I sang and we both collaborated on compositions.” Together Kaur and Sodhi wrote such classics as “Chan Kithe Guzari Aai Raat,” “Lathe Di Chadar,” “Shonkan Mele Di,” and “Gori Diyan Jhanjran”, “Sarke-Sarke Jandiye Mutiare”. The couple they also served as the public face of the Indian People’s Theatre Association (IPTA), an arm of the Indian Communist party in Punjab, spreading messages of peace and love to the most remote villages of East Punjab; she also travelled to many parts of the world performing Punjabi folk songs, gaining rapid popularity.

In all Kaur recorded more than 2,000 songs, among them duets with Asa Singh Mastana, Harcharan Grewel, Rangilla Jatt, and Didar Sandhu. Although her life and collaboration with Sodhi was cut short upon the educator’s death in 1975, she continued the family’s creative tradition via duets with their daughter and disciples, Rupinder Kaur Guleria, better known as Dolly Guleria and granddaughter Sunaina, culminating in the 1995 LP, ‘Surinder Kaur – The Three Generations .

She was conferred the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award for Punjabi Folk Music in 1984, by the Sangeet Natak Academi, India’s National Academy of Music, Dance and Theatre, the Millennium Punjabi Singer award, and Padma Shri award in 2006 for her contribution in Arts. The Guru Nanak Dev University conferred on her a doctorate in the year 2002

Towards the later part of her life, wanting to get close to her mitti, Surinder Kaur settled in Panchkula in 2004, with an aim to construct a house in Zirakpur, near Chandigarh. Subsequently, on 22 December 2005, she suffered a heart attack and was admitted to General Hospital, Panchkula. Later, however, she looked up and personally went to Delhi to receive the coveted Padma Shri Award in January 2006. It is another matter that she was painfully aware of the events that delayed the honour for so long, despite her unparalleled contribution to Punjabi music. But even when she received the award she was regretful that the nomination for the same had come from Haryana and not Punjab for which she worked tirelessly through five decades.

In 2006, a prolonged illness prompted Kaur to seek treatment in the U.S. she died in a New Jersey hospital on June 15 at the age of 77. She was survived by three daughters, eldest, singer Dolly Guleria who lives in Panchkula, followed by Nandini Singh and Pramodini Jaggi, both settled in New Jersey. Upon the death, the Prime minister of India, Dr. Manmohan Singh described her as “the nightingale of Punjab”, and “a legend in Punjabi folk music and popular music and a trend-setter in Punjabi melody.” and added, “I hope that her immortal voice will motivate other artists to practice the right Punjabi folk music tradition”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Krishna Chandra De (KC Dey)

Saturday, December 18th, 2010
Krishna Chandra De KC Dey

Krishna Chandra De KC Dey

Krishna Chandra De (KC Dey)

Krishna Chandra Dey (Bengali: কৃষ্ণ চন্দ্র দে) (1893–1962) better known as K.C. Dey, was a Bengali actor, singer and music composer and teacher born in Calcutta (now Kolkata). He was S.D. Burman’s first musical teacher and mentor. He worked for New Theatres in Kolkata until 1940. He is best remembered for his Kirtan songs.

Dey sang and composed music for movies from 1932 till 1946. He did also act in movies in the same period. Dey used to travel from Calcutta to Bombay (Mumbai) to take part in movies. In 1942 he moved to Bombay. Dey quit movies in 1946 after both his music and singing started lacking his previous quality. Dey died as a bachelor in Kolkata in 1962. Famous playback singer Manna Dey is his nephew.

The artists who have contributed to the development of Bengali culture in various streams, by their creative faculty, have now mostly passed into oblivion. It may be thought obligatory that, to the new generation, these men and women should be brought into the contemporary limelight.

The blind singer – Sri KRISHNA CHANDRA DEY – is one of the many such vocal musical artist of Bengal. As a singer and actor, in both of these roles, and also as a music director, of the few artistes who have left a deep and lasting impression in the heart of the Bengali people, K.C. Dey (Blind Singer) is the most venerable.

Krishna Chandra Dey saw the light of this world in August 1893 (Bengali : 9th Bhadra 1301) on the holy Janmashtami Day (birthday of Lord Krishna). To commemorate the auspicious birthday, the father Shib Chandra Dey and mother Ratnamala Devi, named the baby, Krishna.

From the early childhood, young krishna Chandra showed an affection towards music and could sing well. He used to attend many musical gatherings in his youth. At the age of thirteen years (in 1906) he lost his eyesight after suffering from severe pain in the head. All medical treatments failed and he soon became blind. His love of music then found it’s way through constant endeavour of vocal performances.

Eminent musicians such as Sashi Bushan Dey, Satish Chattopaddhya, Darshan Singh, Ustad Keramutulla Khan, Ustad Badal Khan, Amarnath Bhattacharya, Dabir Khan, Satish Dutta and Radha Raman Das, along with a galaxy of others all contributed to his musical training. From the musical gatherings at the famous Bengali srestler Gobarbabu’ house, he gradually started appearing before the public.

Krishna Chandra Dey’s first music-master was Sashi Bhusan Chatterjee and he was later trained in ‘khayal’ by Badal Khan; ‘dhrupad’ by Dani Babu; ‘kirton’ by Radha Raman, and in tabla-playing by Kanthey Maharaj of Benaras.

In february 1917, he provided his first recordings for the Gramophone Co Lts., at their recording studios that were attached to their factory at 139, Beliaghatta Road, Sealdah, Calcutta.

Over the next few years his musical carer appears to have been relatively eneventful, except that with good classical training his powerful yet melodious voice had been brought to maturity.

in 1923 he entered the world of Bengali Theatre. Krishna Chandra Dey made the first professional appearance in Sisir Kumar Bhaduri’s Natyamandir troupe, with the staging of Manilal Ganguli’s “Basanta Leela” which opened in the Alfred Theatre (now Grace Cinema) on 23 March 1924. K.C. Dey appeared in the role of ‘Basanta Doot’ and his songs were a highlight of the playlet.

On 6 August 1924, Sisir Kumar Bhaduri presented his reformed company in the name of Monmohan Natyamandir at the Monmohan Theatre in Beadon Street, with Jogesh Chandra Chaudhuri’s mythological drama “Seeta”, an event attended by several dignitories of Calcutta. In this drama Krishna Chandra Dey played the role of ‘Baitulik’ and his singing created a sensation, particularly his song – “Ondhokarer Ontoreytey Asru Baadol Jhorey” – the popularity of which confirmed his stature as a ‘Gramophone Celebrity’.

The success of Krishna Chandra Dey’s performance in “Seeta” enthralled th theatre going public, with the drama celebrating it’s centenary on 5 July 1925. Following “Seeta” – Krishna Chandra Dey was presented again in a repeat performanc of “Basabta Leela” at the Monmohan Theatre, which opened on 20 August 1925. In 1926, Sisir Kumar Bhaduri reformed his drama company into Natyamandir Ltd., on the stage of the Cornwallis Theatre. On 26 June 1926, Krishna Chandra Dey was presented in the staging of Rabindra Nath Tagore’s “Visarjan”.

With growing success Krishna Chandra Dey performed in other presentations of dramas at the Star Theatre and the Minerva Theatre. On 11 August 1928, the Minerva Theatre presented Jaladhar Chattopadhya’s romantic playatyer Sandhan” in which Krishna Chandra Dey’s songs were a great attraction. Other dramas presented by the Minerva Theatre in which Krishna Chandra Dey appeared were Sarat Chandra Ghosh’s “Sree” in 1929, and Jaladhar Chattopadhya’s “Ranga Rakhi” presented in June 1930.

On 22 December 1928, Krishna Chandra Dey took part in Sarat Chandra Ghosh’s drama “Jaatichyuta” in the role of ‘Girinath’ at Minerva Theatre. That a blind actor could perform such a difficult role, could only be visually experienced, and had amazed the audiences at the time.

Although Krishna Chandra Dey had achieved great success as a performer on the Bengali stage, and was well known for his renditions of Bengali songs, the attractive quality of his voice had reached far across India. The release of several Hindustani recordings by the Gramophone Co., Ltd., met with considerable popularity, and further strengthened his reputation as a great artist and ‘Gramophone Celebrity’.

Krishna Chandra Dey and others used to prform dramas in different places in the name of Dipali Natya Sangha. Miss Tarakbala (alias Miss Light) then a famous and  beautiful actress of Star Theatre and the Art Theatre came into contact with K.C. Dey, for her songs, and also joined ‘Dipali Natya Sangha’.

In 1931, Krishna Chandra Dey formed his own theatrical company, along with the well-known actor Rabindra Mohan Roy and some other associates, in the name of Rungmahal, on Cornwallis Street. Sisir Kumar Bhaduri, recently returned from United States of America, was invited to play the lead role in Jogesh Chandra Choudhuri’s “Sri Sri Vishnu-Priya” which opened on 2 August 1931, with Krishna Chandra Dey in the role of ‘Pagul’ and as the music director. This drama was followed by several other plays in which Krishna Chandra Dey was featured, including “Bejoyini” – “Ranger Khela” – “Sindhu Gaurab” – “Asabarna” – “Rajyyasri”.

The Rungmahal Theatre continued to operate under new management from 1933, and although Krishna Chandra Dey remained interested in the development of the Bengali Theatre, he had already turned his creative and musical talent to the emerging ‘motion picture’ industry.

Krishna Chandra Dey had made his first appearance in a ‘Talkie film’ made by Madan Theatres, Calcutta, and released at the Crown Cinema, Calcutta, on 13 March 1931, (renamed ‘Uttara’ Cinema in 1935) – featuring two songs being sung by K.C. Dey.

On 24 September 1932, the New Theatres Ltd., production of the Bengali film “Chandidas” was released at the ‘Chitra’ cinema (now named ‘Mitra’) with Krishna Chandra Dey, in both acting and singing roles. The songs from “Chandidas” opened another chapter in the illustrious career of K.C. Dey and confirmed him as one of the most popular entertainers of the time.

Between 1933 and 1935, Krishna Chandra Dey was in demand not only as an actor and singer, but also as a music director for motion pictures, being produced by East India Films, New Theatres Ltd., both of Calcutta, and also Sagar Movietone, Bombay. The Gramophone Co., Ltd., were also not hesitant in retaining Krishna Chandra Dey, on their roster of celebrity artists, as he was one of the very few recording personalities that the company could market product to several areas of interest at the same time.

Krishna Chandra Dey was appointed to the Advisory Committee of the All India Bengal Music Conference of 1938-39, he also gave a performance of Dhrupad style singing in the presenttion of ‘Demonstrations by Musicians’ held during the conference.

During the 1930s and 1940s, Krishna Chandra Dey directed the music for a number of Bengali dramas and performed in several other plays including “Parasar” – Govindadas” – “Majhi” – Nidhiram” – “Amarnath” – “Srinath” and “Anandaswami”.Similarly, his appearances in Bengali and Hindi motion pictures, both as actor and singer, as well as undertaking the task of music director for several films, meant that his name was always at the fore-front of popular entertainment. Krishna Chandra Dey was one of the leading performers of the feature films produced by New Theatres Ltd., and music director for a number of Bengali feature films produced by Kali Film Co., Calcutta.

In 1942, Krishna Chandra Dey re-located to Bombay where he performed the duties of music director, along with acting and singing roles. Since 1917, K.C. Dey had been a recording artiste associated with The Gramophone Co., Ltd., and up to his move to Bombay, all of his recordings had been recorded and issued on ‘HIS MASTER’S VOICE’ – mostly in the prestigious P-10000 (Hindustani) and P-11500 (Bengali_ series – usually with ‘Red’ label.

Although listed as Music Director for the films “Tamanna” and “Mera Gaon” (Laxmi Productions, Bombay) – K.C. Dey acted and sang in both of these films and the recordings issues of songs from these films were released on the ‘YOUNG INDIA’ label – which was manufactured in Bombay by the National Gramophone Record Manufacturing Co., Ltd., of Wadala.

These disc records on ‘YOUNG INDIA’ represent the only issues in over twenty five years of his recording career that were not recorded and issued by the Gamophone Co., Ltd., although K.C. Dey also provided the music for several films produced in Bombay at this time, of which the songs were issued on ‘HIS MASTER’S VOICE’ – in the various N- series of ‘Plum’ label.

The recordings of Krishna Chandra Dey of traditional styles of song always achieved great popularity, in particular his renderings of ‘Kirtan’ along with Baul and Bhatiali songs. K.C. Dey also helped to popularise the ‘thumri’ – ‘dadra’ and ‘gazal’ sung in Bengali.

K.C. Dey’s many recordings in Hindustani and Urdu were equally popular with the record buying public, and during the 1940s he also recorded some Gujarati songs, along with some ‘modern’ and ‘patriotic’ songs in Hindi.

Th Bengali songs, ‘Chand Boley Kachey Eso’ and ‘Notun Raakhsal Kon Surey Gao Gaan’ – with lyrics written by Kabi Hemendra Kumar Roy, set to music by K.C. Dey, was one of the very first examples of a Bengali song to be performed in European ‘harmonised’ fashin (HMV P-1191) in 1934.

The tunes of most of his recordings were composed by K.C. Dey himself, and the lyricists, of whom he sung the songs of, include the famous Bengali poets, such as Hemendra Kumar Roy, Sailen Roy, Ajoy Bhattacharya, Bani Kumar, Mohini Choudhury, Hemanta Gupta and Rabindra Nath Tagore, alog with several others.

In 1947, the Bengali film “Purabi” was produced under the banner of K.C. Dey Productions, Calcutta. Krishna Chandra Dey performed as actor and singer, along with the dutie of producer. The Bengali Film ‘Anirban’ and ‘Dristi Dan’ followed in 1948, and ‘Banomer Meye’ in 1949, under different production houses. In 1950, Krishna Chandra Dey, was music director for the Bengali film ‘Kanakantala Light Railway’ and in 1957, he gave his last performance in the Bengali film’Ektara’ as a Guest Artist.

Krishna Chandra Dey is usually referred to as having been a confirmed bachelor, however, he is known to have been closely associated with Miss Tarakbala (Miss Light) and to have prepared the music for her recordings, a few of which were issued by The Gramophone Co., Ltd., on the “TWIN” record label, during the 1930s. Krishna Chandra Dey and Miss Tarakbala were married according to Hindu rites, in the presence of a Brahmin ‘Purohit’. (Reference – Bengali film magazine, PROSAD – Pous 1380).

After the marriage, Miss Tarakbala was renamed as Roma Dey, and was lovingly called ‘Memsahib’ by K.C. Dey. A son was born to the couple, but died at the age of 14 years. Krishna Chandra Dey gifted a house to Roma Dey in Mahendra Goswami Lane, Calcutta, and on his death-bed requested his relatives to see that Roma Dey was well cared for after his passing, however, it seems that after his death she led a solitary life in retirement, all alone.

Krishna Chandra Dey died on 28 November 1962, at 8.20 P.P. at the age of 69 years, at his home in Madan Ghosh Lane, Calcutta.

K.C. Dey was one of the leading musicians of Bengal cinema, particularly the New Theatres’ of Calcutta, in an era dominated by stalwarts such as K. L. Saigal and Pankaj Mullick. It was K.C. Dey who influenced Manna Dey to take to music. Otherwise he would have ended up as a barrister, which his chartered accountant father wanted him to be.

Krishna Chandra Dey was born in Calcutta in 1904. He developed a strong liking for kites at the age of 13 and his lust for kite flying ultimately costed him his eyesight, which he lost because of flying kites in strong daylight. Thereafter, he became ‘Andh Kavi’ K. C. Dey. After having lost his vision, his love for music grew very intensely and he received intense training in music under various renowned experts including Ustaad Dabbeer Khan.

K. C. Dey used to sing for films of Calcutta’s East India Company (of Kardar Saheb) and New Theatres. Among the films to which K.C. Dey rendered his voice of rich timbre were Puran Bhagat, Devadas (in Hindi and Bengali, directed by Pramatesh Barua), Vidyapathi, Dhartimatha, and Bhagyachakra. His song “Jao Jao Aye Mere Sadhu” from the New Theatres’ film Puran Bhagat (1933), with hardly any orchestra, except perhaps the harmonium and the cymbals, still enthrals music lovers who prefer the pristine film music of old to the high decibel sing-song which is the only film music today’s children know of. He used to travel to Bombay for his recordings. He sang ‘Bhagwaan Karega Madad Teri..’ and ‘Na Ranj Kar Badnaseeb Bharat..’ in Educated Wife (1934). Finally he shifted to Bombay in 1942.

In Bombay he tried his hands in Music Direction too, apart from singing. His noticeable films were ‘Badalti Duniya’ and ‘Devdasi’. He was not comfortable in Bombay, he started degrading. His songs and music started lacking his original natural touch. He returned to Calcutta in 1946 and people gradually forgot the melody of his magnificent voice. He passed away in 1962, in Calcutta leaving no one behind since he remained bachelor.

K. C. Dey had an unparalleld voice. No other singer of his era or times to follow could match his talent. His voice had the magical effect to touch any heart.

Actor

  • Bhagaban Shrikrishna Chaitanya (1954)
  • Pralhad (1952)
  • Anirban (1948)
  • Drishtidan (1948)
  • Purabi (1948)
  • Insaan (1944)… Blind singer
  • Chanakya (1939)… Beggar
  • Sapera (1939)
  • Sapurey (1939)… Ghantaburo … aka The Snake-Charmer (India: English title)
  • Desher Mati (1938)… Kunja… aka Mother Earth.. aka Motherland … aka Soil of the Motherland
  • Dharti Mata (1938)… Kunja
  • Bidyapati (1937)… Madhusudan
  • Vidyapati (1937)… Madhusudan
  • Devdas (1936)
  • Grihadaha (1936)
  • Manzil (1936)
  • Maya (1936/I)
  • Maya (1936/II)
  • Pujarin (1936)… Blind Beggar
  • Bhagya Chakra (1935)… Surdas
  • Devdas (1935)
  • Dhoop Chhaon (1935)… Surdas
  • Inquilab (1935)… Musafir
  • Shaher Ka Jadoo (1934)… Baldev
  • Nala Damayanti (1933)
  • Puran Bhagat (1933)
  • Sabitri (1933)… Dyumatsen
  • Meera (1933)
  • Chandidas (1932)… Sridam
  • Bhagaban Shrikrishna Chaitanya (1954) (playback singer)
  • Sapurey (1939) (playback singer)
  • Dharti Mata (1938) (playback singer)
  • Vidyapati (1937) (playback singer)
  • Bhagya Chakra (1935) (playback singer)
  • Devdas (1935) (playback singer)
  • Chandidas (1932) (playback singer)
  • Purabi (1948)
  • Shakuntala (1941)
  • Ambikapathy (1937)
  • Sonar Sansar (1936)
  • Sunehra Sansar (1936)
  • Shaher Ka Jadoo (1934)

Music Department

Composer

  • Purabi (1948)
  • Shakuntala (1941)
  • Ambikapathy (1937)
  • Sonar Sansar (1936)
  • Sunehra Sansar (1936)
  • Shaher Ka Jadoo (1934)

Juthika Roy

Sunday, December 12th, 2010
She started singing at an early age. She has sung many songs for music directors including her first mentor Kazi Nazrul Islam (whom she called Kazi Da) and the great bengali music director Kamal Dasgupta. It is said that Kamal Das Gupta and Kumari Juthika Roy recorded a naat in the late 1930s that impressed Gupta so much that he embraced Islam. Her singing was liked by many including Mahatma Gandhi. She has sung for many Bengali & Hindi movies also but she is most popularly known for her Meera Bhajans. She is now over 85 years old and lives in her Shyampukur Street, Kolkata house with her sisters.
Juthika Roy is a legendary bhajan singer with a very sweet voice. She started singing at the age of seven and recorded her first Hindi bhajan at the age of 12. Her first album was recorded with the guidance of her mentor Kazi Nazrul Islam whom she called Kazi Da. She sang many songs for the great music director Kamal Dasgupta. She went on to sing in Bengali & Hindi movies also but she is best known for her Meera Bhajans. She was awarded the Padmashree in 1972.
On August 15, 1947, Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru’s motorcade rolls down from Teenmurti Bhavan to the Red Fort. Juthika Roy had just finished singing for a 15-minute slot at the All India Radio (AIR) station. A man came running, urging her to return to the studio. The Prime Minister had sent in a request that she was to keep singing till he reached Red Fort and hoisted the Tiranga Jhanda (Tricolour Flag). So she went back and started off with Sone ka Hindustan. I must have sung 7 or 8 songs, the 85-year-old reflects, sitting in a sun-bathed room of her Shyampukur Street house where she stays tucked away from the bustle of north Calcutta, with her two sisters.
Juthika Roy was then at the height of her fame. She had been hailed as ‘adhunik Meera’ and was criss-crossing the country and even beyond to Sri Lanka and East Africa for performances. She says “I would come back to Calcutta from one part of the country and find a telegram waiting at home inviting me to another show elsewhere.”
The Statesman – India – by Juthika Roy – August 6, 2006
Juthika Roy chronicles a historic meeting with the Father of the Nation
A beautiful idiom in the English language is ~ time and tide wait for none. But we fail to understand properly the supreme truth behind it. And so, we weep when we come across the sorrows and pangs of life and spill out our joy when happiness comes. This is our nature. We cannot understand how we can better our lives. For this, we require a genuine guru and ideals, through which we can seek an appropriate path at the appropriate moment.
As a child I used to listen as my mother related the many episodes in the lives of great men. She would tell me about their great lives and deeds.
Mother would say, “The ideals of great men would have to be made the usherers, if one is to make one’s life beautiful ~ great men like Sri Ramakrishna, Swami Vivekananda, Mahatma Gandhi, Sarojini Naidu and others of their ilk.”
We started living in Calcutta permanently in 1930. My first disc of Bengali songs was released by the Gramaphone Company in 1934. The songs were:
Soon after, my rendition of Bengali and Hindi bhajans were released by the Gramaphone Company. Invitations started pouring from different parts of the country in for me to render bhajans. In 1939 I received the first invitation to sing bhajans at the Allahabad Conference. There, I was invited by Professor Deodhar to sing in Bombay at his municipal school’s charity function. From that year onwards, I travelled to Bombay, Ahmedabad, Surat, Baroda, Rajkot and the entire of Gujarat every year.
We went to Hyderabad from Bombay in 1945 to participate in a charity programme there. That was my first visit to Hyderabad. Our stay was arranged at a swanky guest house of a renowned zamindar there. The next day, when I was preparing to rehearse with the accompanist, I heard that Sarojini Naidu had come to listen to me sing bhajans. I was as much scared as elated. Upon entering the hall I saw her sitting on a sofa; her daughter was sitting beside her. I made obeisance to her. She put her hand on my head and made me sit beside her. There was a look of surprise on her face when she saw me.
Then, she gave me some good news. Mahatma Gandhi used to listen to my songs everyday when he was jailed in Pune. He used to start his prayer meeting every morning playing discs that played my bhajans. I would have never known of these happenings. My pride and joy knew no bounds. I made obeisance to the God within myself and said, “My singing of bhajans has been a great accomplishment. I’m blessed.”
Afterwards, Sarojini Naidu asked me if I had ever met Mahatma Gandhi. Ruefully, I said, “No, that I haven’t had that good luck.” She then said, “Try to meet Bapuji and let him listen to his favourite bhajans.” From then I began to try out means of meeting Bapuji.
My respect for Sarojini Naidu went up many notches. I deemed myself blessed by having her as a near one. She was courageous, a scholar, patriot and poet whom I adored from afar. I still cherish this valuable memory.
It was 1947 (sic). The country was simmering with satyagraha, civil disobedience, non-cooperation, Gandhiji’s Quit India movement and so on. A highly-strung atmosphere prevailed. All were on tenterhooks ~ would the British rule really end? And it really ended. But then Hindu-Muslim riots started. A shiver goes down my spine when I recall those days. No one can believe unless one sees those brutalities, murders, beastliness with one’s own eyes.
Mahatma Gandhi came to Calcutta at that time to quell the situation. He put up at a house in Beliaghata with his entourage. Bapuji was so busy with his work that he did not have even one minute to spare. I heard that he would wake up every day at 6 a.m. and go out for a morning walk. He would join the prayer meeting in the morning and evening. Taking Sarojini Naidu’s advice, my parents decided to take me to the Beliaghata house to meet Bapuji. My mother, brothers and sisters, uncle and I reached Beliaghata at 7 a.m. We decided to have his darshan from afar during his morning walk and offer our obeisance to him. But, unfortunately, when we reached the gate we heard that Bapuji had already taken his morning walk and was resting. We would have to wait three hours if we wanted to see him. Finding no other way, we remained standing outside the gate because it had been locked by then. Many others also remained standing along with us.
The sunbeams were brilliant. But suddenly, black clouds appeared and covered the sky. It began to rain heavily. We were completely drenched. My uncle repeatedly requested the gate-keeper to let us in but the keeper kept saying, “No, Bapuji hasn’t ordered me to do so.” But my uncle was not a man to spare any effort. He then sternly said, “All right, go in and say Juthika Roy has come to meet Bapuji.” The gatekeeper went in. We prayed that he would report correctly. Suddenly, we saw Manu Gandhi and some volunteers rushing towards the gate with some umbrellas. Manu Gandhi accosted me, made her obeisance and opened the gate. “Come in, please, all of you. I’m so sorry you are all drenched. Come inside and sit.”
We all went in and took our seats. Then Ava Gandhi came and said to me, “Bapuji has allowed your mother to go in with you.” We went in and saw Gandhiji writing something sitting on a mat. He was bare bodied, his face and his entire body were radiating some strange light. There was no sign of tiredness on his person even after so much of work. There was a smile on her face, his eyes were shining as if they were full of love and were images of peace.
I felt it was our great good luck that for the first time we had darshan of Mahatma Gandhi. I cannot fully express how elated I was. My mother and I made obeisance to Bapuji. He touched our heads to bless us, smiled and asked us to sit down using sign language. He was observing silence on that day, saying everything in writing. Ava Gandhi was reading out his writings for us. She was of great help.
Ava Gandhi informed us that Bapuji was busy but eager to listen to my bhajans. So, he had decided that I would be singing while he was bathing in the next room. Bapuji went into the next room. I went on singing one bhajan after another without the help of any instrument. The songs were ~ “Maine Chakrar rakhi ji”, “Main Ram nam ki churiyan pahenu”, “Gunghukta pat khol re”, “Main to wari jaun Ram”, “Alo main apne Ram”, “Matja yogi mat ja” and “Pyare gungut bangh Meera nachire”.
Bapuji came out after having his bath and stood in front of us. I stopped singing made obeisance to him. He flashed a broad smile and blessed us by raising his hand. I said to myself that my life was blessed today, so was my singing of the bhajan. My mind was filled with bliss.
Later, Ava told us that Bapuji had asked us to join the afternoon prayer at 4 p.m. We arrived at the Maidan from the Beliaghata house soon after 4 p.m. with Bapuji to attend a prayer meeting. There was Ava Gandhi, Manu Gandhi and many others among us. The Maidan was crowded and there was not an iota of space left in the ocean of people.
The two sides of the road were also crowded. Bapuji’s car slowly proceeded towards the Maidan. People welcomed him by throwing flowers and petals. A large number of people were conveying their respect to Bapuji. That was an unforgettable spectacle and cannot be expressed in words ~ it can only be felt. I still remember that living picture of crested reverence and euphoria for a leader of the people.
Our car stopped next to the dais in the Maidan. Bapuji climbed on the dais quickly, flinging his arms on the shoulders of Ava and Manu. I was sitting at a corner of the dais. The prayer meeting started with Ramdhum, then readings from the Gita. Then, Bapuji appealed to people to maintain peace throughout the country. The prayer meeting ended with my singing of a bhajan.
Soon, we came to the Beliaghata house with Bapuji. A car was provided to drop us home. My long cherished ambition to see Bapuji and to see him listen to my bhajans was fulfilled. I still consider that day as an auspicious day in my life.
meri prem ki naiya (sung for Kamal Dasgupta)
darshan bina prabhuji
ghunghat ka pat khol
kanhaiya pe tan man
pag ghungharu bandh meera nachi
tore angse ang milake kanhaii
tulsi mira sur kabir
badal dekh rahi
bolre madhuban mein
chupke chupke bol maina
Roti Ankhiyan
aakash tale jab deep
aankhin mein mathura
Anjaan nagar anjaan dagar
Maine Chakrar rakhi ji
Main Ram nam ki churiyan pahenu
Main to wari jaun Ram
Meri Veena Ro Rahi Hai
Mat ja jogi mat ja
Pag gunghat bandh Meera nachire

She started singing at an early age. She has sung many songs for music directors including her first mentor Kazi Nazrul Islam (whom she called Kazi Da) and the great bengali music director Kamal Dasgupta. It is said that Kamal Das Gupta and Kumari Juthika Roy recorded a naat in the late 1930s that impressed Gupta so much that he embraced Islam. Her singing was liked by many including Mahatma Gandhi. She has sung for many Bengali & Hindi movies also but she is most popularly known for her Meera Bhajans. She is now over 85 years old and lives in her Shyampukur Street, Kolkata house with her sisters.Juthika Roy is a legendary bhajan singer with a very sweet voice. She started singing at the age of seven and recorded her first Hindi bhajan at the age of 12. Her first album was recorded with the guidance of her mentor Kazi Nazrul Islam whom she called Kazi Da. She sang many songs for the great music director Kamal Dasgupta. She went on to sing in Bengali & Hindi movies also but she is best known for her Meera Bhajans. She was awarded the Padmashree in 1972.
On August 15, 1947, Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru’s motorcade rolls down from Teenmurti Bhavan to the Red Fort. Juthika Roy had just finished singing for a 15-minute slot at the All India Radio (AIR) station. A man came running, urging her to return to the studio. The Prime Minister had sent in a request that she was to keep singing till he reached Red Fort and hoisted the Tiranga Jhanda (Tricolour Flag). So she went back and started off with Sone ka Hindustan. I must have sung 7 or 8 songs, the 85-year-old reflects, sitting in a sun-bathed room of her Shyampukur Street house where she stays tucked away from the bustle of north Calcutta, with her two sisters.
Juthika Roy was then at the height of her fame. She had been hailed as ‘adhunik Meera’ and was criss-crossing the country and even beyond to Sri Lanka and East Africa for performances. She says “I would come back to Calcutta from one part of the country and find a telegram waiting at home inviting me to another show elsewhere.”

The Statesman – India – by Juthika Roy – August 6, 2006 Juthika Roy chronicles a historic meeting with the Father of the Nation A beautiful idiom in the English language is ~ time and tide wait for none. But we fail to understand properly the supreme truth behind it. And so, we weep when we come across the sorrows and pangs of life and spill out our joy when happiness comes. This is our nature. We cannot understand how we can better our lives. For this, we require a genuine guru and ideals, through which we can seek an appropriate path at the appropriate moment. As a child I used to listen as my mother related the many episodes in the lives of great men. She would tell me about their great lives and deeds. Mother would say, “The ideals of great men would have to be made the usherers, if one is to make one’s life beautiful ~ great men like Sri Ramakrishna, Swami Vivekananda, Mahatma Gandhi, Sarojini Naidu and others of their ilk.” We started living in Calcutta permanently in 1930. My first disc of Bengali songs was released by the Gramaphone Company in 1934. The songs were: Soon after, my rendition of Bengali and Hindi bhajans were released by the Gramaphone Company. Invitations started pouring from different parts of the country in for me to render bhajans. In 1939 I received the first invitation to sing bhajans at the Allahabad Conference. There, I was invited by Professor Deodhar to sing in Bombay at his municipal school’s charity function. From that year onwards, I travelled to Bombay, Ahmedabad, Surat, Baroda, Rajkot and the entire of Gujarat every year. We went to Hyderabad from Bombay in 1945 to participate in a charity programme there. That was my first visit to Hyderabad. Our stay was arranged at a swanky guest house of a renowned zamindar there. The next day, when I was preparing to rehearse with the accompanist, I heard that Sarojini Naidu had come to listen to me sing bhajans. I was as much scared as elated. Upon entering the hall I saw her sitting on a sofa; her daughter was sitting beside her. I made obeisance to her. She put her hand on my head and made me sit beside her. There was a look of surprise on her face when she saw me. Then, she gave me some good news. Mahatma Gandhi used to listen to my songs everyday when he was jailed in Pune. He used to start his prayer meeting every morning playing discs that played my bhajans. I would have never known of these happenings. My pride and joy knew no bounds. I made obeisance to the God within myself and said, “My singing of bhajans has been a great accomplishment. I’m blessed.” Afterwards, Sarojini Naidu asked me if I had ever met Mahatma Gandhi. Ruefully, I said, “No, that I haven’t had that good luck.” She then said, “Try to meet Bapuji and let him listen to his favourite bhajans.” From then I began to try out means of meeting Bapuji. My respect for Sarojini Naidu went up many notches. I deemed myself blessed by having her as a near one. She was courageous, a scholar, patriot and poet whom I adored from afar. I still cherish this valuable memory. It was 1947 (sic). The country was simmering with satyagraha, civil disobedience, non-cooperation, Gandhiji’s Quit India movement and so on. A highly-strung atmosphere prevailed. All were on tenterhooks ~ would the British rule really end? And it really ended. But then Hindu-Muslim riots started. A shiver goes down my spine when I recall those days. No one can believe unless one sees those brutalities, murders, beastliness with one’s own eyes. Mahatma Gandhi came to Calcutta at that time to quell the situation. He put up at a house in Beliaghata with his entourage. Bapuji was so busy with his work that he did not have even one minute to spare. I heard that he would wake up every day at 6 a.m. and go out for a morning walk. He would join the prayer meeting in the morning and evening. Taking Sarojini Naidu’s advice, my parents decided to take me to the Beliaghata house to meet Bapuji. My mother, brothers and sisters, uncle and I reached Beliaghata at 7 a.m. We decided to have his darshan from afar during his morning walk and offer our obeisance to him. But, unfortunately, when we reached the gate we heard that Bapuji had already taken his morning walk and was resting. We would have to wait three hours if we wanted to see him. Finding no other way, we remained standing outside the gate because it had been locked by then. Many others also remained standing along with us. The sunbeams were brilliant. But suddenly, black clouds appeared and covered the sky. It began to rain heavily. We were completely drenched. My uncle repeatedly requested the gate-keeper to let us in but the keeper kept saying, “No, Bapuji hasn’t ordered me to do so.” But my uncle was not a man to spare any effort. He then sternly said, “All right, go in and say Juthika Roy has come to meet Bapuji.” The gatekeeper went in. We prayed that he would report correctly. Suddenly, we saw Manu Gandhi and some volunteers rushing towards the gate with some umbrellas. Manu Gandhi accosted me, made her obeisance and opened the gate. “Come in, please, all of you. I’m so sorry you are all drenched. Come inside and sit.” We all went in and took our seats. Then Ava Gandhi came and said to me, “Bapuji has allowed your mother to go in with you.” We went in and saw Gandhiji writing something sitting on a mat. He was bare bodied, his face and his entire body were radiating some strange light. There was no sign of tiredness on his person even after so much of work. There was a smile on her face, his eyes were shining as if they were full of love and were images of peace. I felt it was our great good luck that for the first time we had darshan of Mahatma Gandhi. I cannot fully express how elated I was. My mother and I made obeisance to Bapuji. He touched our heads to bless us, smiled and asked us to sit down using sign language. He was observing silence on that day, saying everything in writing. Ava Gandhi was reading out his writings for us. She was of great help. Ava Gandhi informed us that Bapuji was busy but eager to listen to my bhajans. So, he had decided that I would be singing while he was bathing in the next room. Bapuji went into the next room. I went on singing one bhajan after another without the help of any instrument. The songs were ~ “Maine Chakrar rakhi ji”, “Main Ram nam ki churiyan pahenu”, “Gunghukta pat khol re”, “Main to wari jaun Ram”, “Alo main apne Ram”, “Matja yogi mat ja” and “Pyare gungut bangh Meera nachire”. Bapuji came out after having his bath and stood in front of us. I stopped singing made obeisance to him. He flashed a broad smile and blessed us by raising his hand. I said to myself that my life was blessed today, so was my singing of the bhajan. My mind was filled with bliss. Later, Ava told us that Bapuji had asked us to join the afternoon prayer at 4 p.m. We arrived at the Maidan from the Beliaghata house soon after 4 p.m. with Bapuji to attend a prayer meeting. There was Ava Gandhi, Manu Gandhi and many others among us. The Maidan was crowded and there was not an iota of space left in the ocean of people. The two sides of the road were also crowded. Bapuji’s car slowly proceeded towards the Maidan. People welcomed him by throwing flowers and petals. A large number of people were conveying their respect to Bapuji. That was an unforgettable spectacle and cannot be expressed in words ~ it can only be felt. I still remember that living picture of crested reverence and euphoria for a leader of the people. Our car stopped next to the dais in the Maidan. Bapuji climbed on the dais quickly, flinging his arms on the shoulders of Ava and Manu. I was sitting at a corner of the dais. The prayer meeting started with Ramdhum, then readings from the Gita. Then, Bapuji appealed to people to maintain peace throughout the country. The prayer meeting ended with my singing of a bhajan. Soon, we came to the Beliaghata house with Bapuji. A car was provided to drop us home. My long cherished ambition to see Bapuji and to see him listen to my bhajans was fulfilled. I still consider that day as an auspicious day in my life.

meri prem ki naiya (sung for Kamal Dasgupta)darshan bina prabhujighunghat ka pat kholkanhaiya pe tan manpag ghungharu bandh meera nachitore angse ang milake kanhaiitulsi mira sur kabirbadal dekh rahibolre madhuban meinchupke chupke bol mainaRoti Ankhiyanaakash tale jab deepaankhin mein mathuraAnjaan nagar anjaan dagarMaine Chakrar rakhi jiMain Ram nam ki churiyan pahenuMain to wari jaun RamMeri Veena Ro Rahi HaiMat ja jogi mat jaPag gunghat bandh Meera nachire